Very Intelligent Princess

Thought of the Week

It’s not like I called her Coffee Table, says Holly Madison, mother of Rainbow

MODERN MANNERS

Etiquette lessons for 3-year olds

 

There has been a sense of sadness with the teaching staff in Llandovery College in Carmarthenshire in South Wales, sadness of the demise of good etiquette in modern manners. So, they decided to put politeness on the curriculum for all their children.

 

Pupils from 3-18 receive lessons in good manners, learning to open doors for females and the correct use of cutlery in restaurants, amongst other basic rules.  These lessons are to help the pupils to be better equipped for the outside world.

The idea is to put old-fashioned manners into a modern context.

 

Lyn Jones (who also attended Lucie Claytons Finishing School) introduced the idea, saying that some forms of etiquette are seriously outdated or sexist, most of the rules are driven by simple good manners.

It is pleasant to open the door, having a good posture helps in later life to avoid back problems, getting out of car with your legs together is simply better than showing all and sundry your underwear!

The school also endeavours to teach pupils to send Thank You messages to others, even in an outdated letter form.

 

The Victorian era taught us Etiquette, but much of it was to humiliate pupils which doesn’t fit into the modern view on manners.  This is why modernising manners is much more in touch with 2018.

 

To have manners, it to respect others, something which somehow gets lost today. It is important to listen to others and not butt into conversations.  To take a phone call at lunch whilst sitting with a friend is incredibly rude and also can look rather desperate.

 

The finishing school called Etiquette Business explains that good manners can help to define a person’s social life and career.  Those who observe basic rules will generally be more successful socially and in business.

 

In the fast-paced world of today, we often forget about others and let us selfishness take over.