Talking to children about PORN

Talking to children about Porn

The concern continues to rise, with children and their easy daily access to porn.

 

The porn which is so easily found online, is promoting sexually aggressive behaviour towards women and girls.  A staggering nearly 90% of most watched porn scenes contain violence against women.  So, parents really need to talk to children before they start learning for themselves from the internet.

 

There is a new programme aimed at parents of tweens (8-12-year olds) who want to have this chat with their offspring.

 

A US NGO called Culture Reframed (founded by academic and anti-porn activist Gail dines) have created an approach to this difficult subject from a feminist perspective.  Its aim is to show parents how to talk to children and was created by experts in public health, adolescent psychology, sexual health education, neuroscience and technology.

Dine calls it the “public health crisis of the digital age”.  She has many figures to support this claim.

A 1/3 of children under 12 have seen pornography

20% of sexts are photos of girls under 15

25% of all internet downloads are porn.

Children are getting access to a mobile phone earlier and earlier on and now it is estimated 25% of 6-year olds use one in the UK.  IN the US it is 10-year olds.

The programme instructs parents how to talk to their child about healthy sexuality and offers guidance to show children how to analyse and understand the implications of sexist and degrading media images.

These conversations are needed vitally as the earlier a boy accesses porn the more sexually aggressive he is going to be towards girls and women, how he might bully girls to send him sexts, he may even develop erectile dysfunction and have anxiety or depression issues.

 

Dines is keen to explore the social, emotional and cognitive impact of porn on children and travel the world to talk with governments, child support agencies and feminist groups.

 

Digital safety classes for UK schools often ignore porn altogether or barely mention it.

 

NSPCC and Middlesex University in 2016 found ¾ of children felt porn did not help them understand sexual consent.  More than half the boys and a third of the girls saw it porn as a real portrayal of sex.

 

There is a real need for a different view of sex offered to children.